What did you have for lunch yesterday?

I honestly can’t remember what I was eating. I remember the project I was working on, and the emails I responded to, but I barely remember the meal itself. Because I ate it so quickly that it was a blip in my day. This is a post for all the workaholics and fast eaters out there (myself included).

Although I can’t remember the meal, I do remember the sluggish feeling I had all afternoon. I did some research to figure out exactly why eating too quickly can be bad, or rather, why eating slowly is so much healthier.

1. Reduce Stress

I recommend 5-10 minutes of mindfulness to many of my clients dealing with stress. They struggle even to find those 10 minutes. Lunch time is easily transformed into a meditative practice when you bring thoughtfulness and patience to eating your food. Bring awareness to each bite and chew with patience. Breathe deeply between bites. Set aside all your devices and don’t eat ANYWHERE near where you work. Just try this and see what happens.

2. Improved Digestion

Chew your food! This is the first line of defense during healthy digestion. You will avoid so many health issues simply by chewing your food more thoroughly. The few extra seconds of chewing also allows the mucous in your mouth break down your food. It takes the burden off your stomach and lower intestines, so you’ll feel energized and healthier. It’s a great way of fighting against many chronic diseases that are exacerbated by inflammation caused by irritated and overworked digestion systems.

 3. Weight Loss

Numerous studies have been released over the past few years that verify eating slow directly links to eating fewer calories. It takes 20 minutes for our stomach to tell our brain that it is full. There is also the split second between bites where we often forget to ask ourselves whether we are hungry or just bored. When you work towards eating healthier foods and also eating slower at each meal, you will make weight loss easy to accomplish.

Small but profound change in your eating habits for lasting change
is why I created Pivot Health.